The Doors

This month’s DIY lays the foundation for all future tinkering…

I may have mentioned that we bought a drafty new farmhouse about 15 years ago.  It was built by the owner, a man who was, sadly, a bit challenged at the skill of installing interior doors.  Even before we moved the furniture in we had permanently removed several doors as they were awkwardly placed and some were downright dangerous as they opened into traffic areas.  A few doors were never replaced and their openings turned into casements, whereas a couple of others were replaced with bi-fold doors.

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So what can you do with a pile of extra doors? This.

Materials (total cost approximately $30)

2  ten foot 2″ x 4″ boards for the sawhorse legs

1   six foot 2″ x 6″ board for the table base that sits atop the sawhorse legs

2   sets of metal sawhorse brackets (4 brackets total)

1   50 count package of 6 x 3/4 flat phillips wood screws

1   interior door (the one I used is 36″ wide and 80″ long) with all hardware removed

 

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Each of the eight table legs are 27″ long and are cut from the 2″ x 4″s. They are then inserted into the metal sawhorse brackets and screwed into place.

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The support boards were cut from one 2″ x 6″ pine board. Since my door is 36″ wide, I cut two 34″ support boards. They too can be screwed into place.  The door lays across these.

 

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The door lays on top of the sawhorses. Mine is not anchored into place although I often think it would be a good idea to do so.  To the right side of the table you can see a white cable underneath it that snakes toward the wall outlet; this is a cable control gizmo I bought later to keep the power cords neat.  It cost about $15.

 

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I drilled a 2″ hole at one end of the table and inserted a grommet; the lamp and laptop cords are threaded through the grommet and cabled together to the wall outlet.  No detail escapes kitty attention.

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5 thoughts on “The Doors

    • I always look at things like useless doors as “design opportunities”…I once placed an old narrow closet door on top of boxes in an upstairs closet and used it as a desk for years. I love re-purposing things. ~kc

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